bog-wood

Bog-wood, also known as abonos and, especially amongst pipe smokers, as morta

This value of deep darkness is a special feature of abonos as construction material whether it be used for the making of semi manufactured goods, veneer, planks or bams, depending on purpose of the final product, or for final goods: furniture, sculptures, and various decorative objects and items for everyday use.

Sites of high quality bog-wood in the world are very rare. In the sites expected to yield it, morta is hard to find, and access to the river bank and its bed is often difficult. Therefore, extensive preparations and the engagement of professional divers are necessary for morta recovery. Morta is located in conditions of total darkness, and its extraction marks its first exposure to light after centuries of entombment.

In England and Ireland, the three main types of bog-wood that can be found are Yew, Oak and Pine. Reserves of the ancient wood can also be found in Russia and Ukraine, where the northern region has a climate favorable to the growth of oak.

In Croatia, bog-wood is typically found in the valley of the Sava River and its tributaries. The age of morta found in Croatian rivers ranges from several hundred years in the southern rivers to the oldest retrieved so far, from the Krapina River, dated at 8290 years old.

In Serbia, bog-wood over 8,000 years old is found in the valleys of the Danube River, Sava River and their tributaries, primarily in the province of Vojvodina.

Saving the wood for further processing is a very delicate matter. Extracted logs must be wrapped in waterproof material and meticulously dried to prevent warping. The process of wood desiccation is complex, and despite great care, most of the raw wood is unsuitable for further processing. For this reason, the price of high quality raw abonos is quite high.